Archive for 27 abril 2016

El Pretérito – The Past Tense in Spanish (Regular Verbs)

The Past Tense in Spanish can be challenging so it’s important to break it up into manageable pieces and study it and practice it well and often.

As we progress through the different verbs I will add new links for you to practice with but for now we will start with the Regular Verbs and some key vocabulary.

Regular Verbs

Below you will find a few exercises to help you revise the Regular verbs in the Pretérito Indefinido (the past tense).

Review of the Preterito Indefinido Regular Verbs with some practice quizzes in the column on the left.

Click here for a good exercise to practice conjugating the Regular Verbs. 

Here is a multiple choice exercise.

Key Vocabulary

And here is some VERY VERY IMPORTANT vocabulary. These words are ‘trigger‘ words for the Preterite Tense. That means that whenever we see them or use them we know we also need to use the Preterite.

Trigger Words for the Preterite Tense

The Present Perfect

This is another Spanish past tense to go along with the Pretérito Indefinido (Preterite or simple past) and the Preterito Imperfecto (Imperfect past or things you ‘used to do’).

Whereas the Preterite and Imperfect are used for events in the past that are considered completed the Present Perfect is used more to describe things that started in the past but continue into the Present.

Basically it’s the equivalent of the tense ‘I have done something’ in English and is made up of two verbs as in English, those being the verb to have and then the ‘past participle of another verb i.e. to eat = eaten, to dance = danced, to speak = spoken.

In Spanish though we use the verb Haber + past participle and so it works like this. NOTE that we do not use Tener in Spanish for this tense:

Haber = to have (done something)

he                                                                                      hablado (from hablar)
has
ha                                  +          Past Participle         comido (from comer)
hemos
habéis                                                                             vivido (from vivir)
han

As you can see to form the past participle you simply remove the -AR from the verb and add -ado, or removed -ER/-IR and add -ido.

There are also a number of irregulars you need to be aware of:

abrir (to open) – abierto (open)

cubrir (to cover) – cubierto (covered)

decir (to say) – dicho (said)

escribir (to write) – escrito (written)

freír (to fry) – frito (fried)

hacer (to do) – hecho (done)

morir (to die) – muerto (dead)

poner (to put) – puesto (put)

resolver (to resolve) – resuelto (resolved)

romper (to break) – roto (broken)

ver (to see) – visto (seen)

volver (to return) – vuelto (returned)

 

 

Below are a series of links which summarise the tense well and allow you to practice with it:

Spanishdict.com gives a decent summary here but it doesn’t specifically mention the irregulars

There is a good summary from studyspanish.com here of the past participles.

And more from studyspanish.com here on the present perfect tense itself. Be sure to do the practice quizzes available on the left hand side.  

Here’s a good practice exercise on BK Nelson.

La Casa y Los Muebles

Unos actividades para practicar el vocabulario de La Casa y Los Muebles.

¿Dónde está?

La Casa de Mis Abuelos

Los Muebles en el Dormitorio – Crucigrama

*** NUEVA ACTIVIDAD *** Muebles de la casa

El Futuro

Un tiempo verbal muy fácil a dominar y será muy importante cuando se trata de escribir ensayos.

Empieza aqui con este enlaces que explica bien cómo formar el future simple.

Ejercicio que os deja cambiar un verbo del pasado al futuro.

Ejercicio de Los Optimistas y Los Pesimistas

Las Ciudades del Futuro

1º Curso – ¿Dónde está tu casa?

Click the link below to practice revising the vocabulary of La Casa:

Some Flashcards you to practice how to say where you live.

Some more Flashcards and Games to learn vocabulary for Los Cuartos

Loads of games to practice with.

And a nice crossword from LanguagesOnline.org